Had to scratch my head to find the right tool for the job today - something that I used regularly at SMX but havn't had much need to use since.

The tool was 'vimdiff'. I needed to compare to configuration files (retrieved from two different servers) to understand what difference existed. Whilst 'diff' alone would've done it, I find the output hard to follow. vimdiff worked wonders!

Google hit I used also has some other useful tools:


For posterity.

Honourable mention for icdiff also.

I was inspired to Google after (yet again) getting frustrated by inconsistent user experience in Microsoft Outlook.


Short version; Outlook's trying to act like a professional word processing package when you use 'HTML' format for email creation, and actively using behavior contrary to pretty much every other MUA.
What's new?

I ordinarily enjoy using Outlook as an MUA but it does have a couple of annoying quirks, this is definately one of them. The content of the above link is likely to be useful.

I came across a Reddit Thread recently which included this gem:

From the comments that have been posted on this thread and what I found on the Mozilla forums so far:

1- In a new tab, type or paste about:config in the address bar and press Enter/Return. Click the button promising to be careful.

2- Set browser.newtab.url to about:blank>

3- To disable the callbacks to tiles.cdn.mozilla.com without enabling the "do not track" feature you need to remove the address from browser.newtabpage.directory.ping and browser.newtabpage.directory.source




So i've now done both of the above and feel much better.

The Reddit page linked to a ZDNet.com article talking about Mozilla's new Advertising strategy. I for one don't need a third party tracking what I do when I click on 'new tab' ... ! Interestingly there's also a move to remove browser.newtab.url due to "Abuse" which seems to be in itself, contentious, but it's possible you'll have to use an addon to achieve the above, at least in part, in the near future.

Amazed that even 3 years later, nothing's changed.

... so which sign-in button do I press?

For future reference, the right hand one of the two is the correct one. This is what you get if you click the left one - a screenshot I took >6 months ago:

Of note, Tweets from 2012:



... their whole process has been broken for at least 3 years and hasn't changed.

This years Tweets:



Today at #NetHui I attended a discussion on Disaster Recovery.
Ham radio got a brief mention.
Then later the same day, I get referred to this:

Never underestimate the value that ham radio can bring to communications 'when all else fails'.

Yes i'm still here. I know i'm not really an active Blogger at the moment (my rants have landed more on Facebook and Twitter than anything else) but I am still alive, and still very, very busy.

PS: Linux Conf 2015 was awesome. You might spy me on http://lca2015.linux.org.au/about/our_team which will give you an idea of what I got up to. At some point I might even write about it....

Sorry, couple more glitches with the server today. Really need to get on to migrating onto the new hardware I have running in parellel...

However I did find this useful stuff today :-)

Force Reboot :
#echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq
#echo b > /proc/sysrq-trigger
If you want to force shutdown machine try this.
#echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq
#echo o > /proc/sysrq-trigger

Remove comments as required. :)

Sorry for the DNS glitch mid-afternoon folks. The good folks at Domainmonger with whom blakjak.net is registered, hid their 'glue' concept within their over-dumbed-down UI so well I didn't find it until necessity forced it, when the only one of my nameservers with current Glue records disappeared for planned downtime (hosted by a friend).

Sorted now. So sorry. #muttermutter

G'day folks.
Tomorrow my main blakjak.net server will be taking a small road-trip to a new home.
This involves an IP address change and some downtime as it moves between locations and is racked up and powered on, etc.
I expect the downtime to be approximately 1200-1330hrs tomorrow (Friday), perhaps shorter.

Sorry for any inconvenience; plenty of measures have been put in place to mitigate operational impacts.

As retrieved from the Waybackmachine...


This Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) has been drafted in order to 'put in writing' what has been well known amongst participants for many years - what sort of behavior is acceptable on the Mailing List.

The NZLUG itself is an informal entity with no official ruling body and no constitution or rules of association. Its successful operation depends on the contribution of its volunteer list/website administrators (Nic Bellamy, Mark Foster, Scott Newton) and Systems Administrators (Nic Bellamy and Dylan Reeve). This document therefore is mainly a commonsense attitude to mailing list netiquette as it particularly applies to us. It is open to feedback, so let us know if you have any suggestions.

General Acceptable Use policies for Mailing Lists worldwide are based on RFC1855. However NZLUG conceeds that much of the information in RFC1855 is out of date and doesn't represent the realities of todays Internet. (But it was a lovely thought.)

As such whilst we encourage participants to read the above RFC it should be treated as largely educational and serve as a guide to the intention behind these policies.

The overriding consideration behind this policy document is 'consideration for others'. If in doubt, use this as your primary concern.

Subject Guidelines

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